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2011
Delicious Magazine Recipe Feature Recipes published in Princes Trust Charity 'Trusty' Cookbook Guest panellist on UKTV Food's 'Market Kitchen' Recipes published in 'Come Dine With Me Special Occasions' book Blog named as a "Media Must-Have" in Jan & Feb issue of Olive Magazine

2010
Launch of Sabrina's one-to-one private cookery tuition Guest critic on Gordon Ramsay's 'F-Word' series finale Organised Top Chef Charity Banquet for Haiti raising £70,000 for 'Action Against Hunger' Seasonal Food & Recipe Writer for 'Blue Tomato'

2009
Winner of Channel 4's 'Come Dine With Me' (West London) 'Bronze' winner in professionally judged 'AA Home Cooking Competition 2009' Appointed resident cookery columnist for Foodepedia

Japanese Rice Risotto with Miso, Lemongrass and Scallops

Japanese Rice Risotto with Miso, Lemongrass and Scallops

Seasonal Penne Mediterraneo

Seasonal Penne Mediterraneo

Persian Split Pea, Dried Lime and Lamb Stew

Persian Split Pea, Dried Lime and Lamb Stew

Tuesday, 12 October 2010

Seasonal Produce - Quince


So what exactly is quince? Well, it's fair to say that most people don't have a clue but those who do would say that it in an old English fruit made popular in Tudor times (and Tudor rhymes!) and others would say it is the main ingredient, along with sugar and lemon juice, to a popular Spanish accompaniment to cheese, called 'Membrillo'. Indeed this is true, but what else can I tell you about this knobbly looking giant apple? The Quince is a relative of both the pear and apple and the ripe fruit resembles a very large, yellowish apple. The tree is native to countries such as Iran (woohoo!), Turkey, Syria, Bulgaria and Greece but to name a few, although Turkey are now the world leaders in Quince production.

Usually Quince must be cooked, but my Mother was regaling tales of eating them uncooked - which I would not recommend. The fruit makes wonderful jam and chutney as well as being a great accompany to roasted meats such as pork and chicken. But Persians like to make stews of everything we can lay our hands on and this is exactly how I first came across Quince, nestled in between slow-braised hunks of lamb in a sweet and savoury sauce.

Quinces are greatly underused in this country and I encourage you all to try roasting them by coring and cutting the Quince into quarters, skin on and drizzling with olive oil, seasonsing with salt and roasting them for 45 mins in a preheated oven on 180 degrees. Serve with a nice roasted chicken or maybe even pork belly... delicious.

4 comments:

  1. Oh, I do like the idea of roasting quince, would never have thought of that. I make quince jelly if ever I can get my hands on any - recently managed to scrump a few - hehe!

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  2. We have a quince "tree" in our garden and I made some Membrillo with them, as I had no idea what else to do with it so will definitely give that a try next year. Lovely to have ideas, felt quite special to have some as I've never seen them for sale before, thanks missy! Kellie xx

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  3. Hello ladies! Very glad the suggestions were of help! I made a traditional Persian stew using Quince wedges, with lamb, split peas, saffron and onion base. It is really lush! Lucky you to have a tree in your garden Kel! Dave Law says he has one too but hates Quince, so I'm hoping he gives me the fruit! lol!

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  4. Our new pup seems to be liking the quince windfalls too... they are so damn hard he can't actually chew them, result! Might save our furniture :) xxx

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